SolarNews – Volume 2016 Number 2

SolarNews
The Electronic Newsletter of the
Solar Physics Division
American Astronomical Society
Volume 2016 Number 2

Aimee Norton, editor
15 January 2016


A Century of Calibrated and Original Mount Wilson Polar Faculae Data Available for Download

Andrés Muñoz-Jaramillo
08 Jan 2016

The number of polar faculae is a very good proxy for the average magnetic field and total signed polar flux present inside the polar crowns.

Neil Sheeley, Jr. created a record of polar faculae counts, at a cadence of one measurement per year (starting in 1906 and ending in 2007), during four separate data reduction campaigns. These data have been now consolidated, cross-callibrated, and calibrated to magnetic measurements taken by the Wilcox Solar Observatory and SOHO/MDI polar flux.

The calibrated data, the original data, and all intermediate calibration steps are available for download at solardynamo.org/data.html

For any questions, suggestions, or concerns, please contact Andrés Muñoz-Jaramillo ([email protected])

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SPD Press Officer

Craig DeForest
10 Jan 2016

After 17 years as press officer, I am stepping down effective at the end of the Spring 2016 SPD meeting.  While I have found outreach to be an effective and rewarding position, it is time to rotate out and let someone else steer the show.  Effective immediately, I have named Henry “Trae” Winter as deputy press officer, and we’ll be working together on outreach for the upcoming meeting.  After the current SPD meeting, we will swap positions to provide a smooth handover.

Meanwhile, it is long past time to formalize the position of Press Officer, which is not currently named in the By-Laws. In particular, qualifications and renewable terms of office should be incorporated in our By-Laws, to bring the position to the status of other roles within SPD. I have suggested to Dana Longcope that this be an agenda item for the SPD Committee, and I plan to work with the Committee to adopt a formal definition into the By-Laws.

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SPD Members Needed to Volunteer for Congressional Visits Day March 15 and 16!

Kelly Korreck
11 Jan 2016

Each year the AAS brings members to Washington, DC to participate in Congressional Visits Day (CVD), to raise visibility and support for research in science, engineering, and technology. This year’s CVD will be held Tuesday-Wednesday, 15-16 March 2016.  Both days require full-day commitments, about 8 am to 6 pm, and business attire is required.

The AAS aims to select at least 15 volunteers who represent a balance among location, career stage, and experience. They especially encourage graduate students to volunteer. The AAS will cover the majority of travel expenses for volunteers selected to participate. Sign-ups are open now through 5:00 pm EST on Friday, 22 January 2016.

Obviously, we want solar/heliophysics research to be well represented in this event. The SPD Public Policy Committee would therefore like to invite you to volunteer, by using the sign-up form at aas.org/content/congressional-visits-day-2016-sign-form . Note that you’ll need to sign in to aas.org using your AAS username and password to submit the form.

Selected members will be notified by the AAS in mid-February. They will travel to Washington, DC, to participate in an all-day seminar on how to communicate effectively with policymakers, followed by a full day of meetings with Capitol Hill and/or White House staff. The pre-briefings will cover both astronomy-specific and more general science-policy issues. During the two weeks prior to your time in Washington, the AAS will also have a series of informational pre-briefings via the Web and/or teleconference, and we expect that a teleconference will also be arranged with selected volunteers and the SPD PPC members.

Please consider contributing your time and talents to this very worthwhile event.

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Special Issue of the Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate “Brightness Variations of the Sun and Sun-like Stars and Resulting Influences on their Environments”

Alexander Shapiro
14 Jan 2016

The deadline for submission to the Topical Issue of the Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate “Brightness Variations of the Sun and Sun-like Stars and Resulting Influences on their Environments” (www.swsc-journal.org/news/251-topical-issue-brightness-variations-of-the-sun-and-sun-like-stars-and-resulting-influences-on-their-environments-submission-deadline-31-january-2016) is 31 January 2016.

The detailed instructions for SWSC authors can be found at www.swsc-journal.org/author-information/instructions-for-authors The editors of the special issue are Greg Kopp, Natalie Krivova, Alexander Shapiro, and Yvonne Unruh.  All submitted papers will be subject to the usual scientific peer-review process of the Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate.

We would appreciate having a short note (please send to Natalie Krivova) and a tentative title in case you plan to submit an article.

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NSO/Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) Operation and Schedule of Proposal Submission in 2016

Han Uitenbroek
14 Jan 2016

The National Solar Observatory (NSO) is fully committed to operate the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) and its full complement of instruments through FY 2017. However, the transition of personnel and resources to operations of the DKIST on Haleakela has already started, and this has implications for operations at current facilities such as the DST.

Observational support in the 2016 will be provided by a reduced staff of two operators and a technical staff of three, down from three operators and a technical staff of five. Consequently, the telescope will not be operated on weekends and holidays. Please account for this weekday-only operation in your observing time requests. In addition, there will be limited on-site science support available, which will be allocated as needed. We will be able to continue to provide support for data reduction pipelines, which are available on the NSO website (nsosp.nso.edu/dst-pipelines).

The NSO will continue to allocate observing time at the DST on a quarterly basis, with deadlines for each quarter one and a half month before the start of the quarter, as before. Thus, deadline for observing proposals will be set on: Feb 15 for the 2nd quarter, May 15 for the 3rd quarter, and Aug 15 for the 4th quarter of 2016.

Details on operation of the DST in 2017 will follow in due time, as changes may be prompted on the basis of our experience in the current year.

Han Uitenbroek DST Program Scientist, NSO Sacramento Peak

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Employment Opportunities

PhD Studentships in Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

Claire Foullon
03 Jan 2016

The Centre for Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics at Exeter is one of the leading research groups of its kind in the UK. Our research encompasses the Fluid Dynamics of Weather and Climate, Theoretical Fluid Dynamics, Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, Solar-Terrestrial Plasmas and Space Weather. We invite applications to study for a PhD starting in Sept 2016.

A) Four fully-funded PhD projects are available in the following areas:

• Magnetic Helicity Flow in the Sun and Heliosphere – Supervisors: Prof. Mitchell Berger and Dr Claire Foullon;
• Modelling of Planetary Atmospheres – Supervisor: Professor Geoffrey Vallis;
• High-performance computing for GAFD – Supervisor: Dr Martin Schreiber;
• Understanding and Improving the Path of the Gulf Stream extension in moderate resolution climate models – Supervisors:  Prof. Beth Wingate and Dr. Mike Bell (Met Office);

The deadline for applications is 1 February 2016.

B) One EPSRC-funded PhD studentship is available in the following area:

• Validation of weather and climate models using asymptotic limits – Supervisors: Dr Bob Beare (UoE), Prof. John Thuburn (UoE), and Prof Mike Cullen (Met Office);

The deadline for applications is 17 January 2016.

We encourage interested applicants to browse our webpages for details of our wide-ranging research activities and further details on how to apply:
tiny.cc/gafd-phd

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Two Post-doctoral Positions in Solar Magnetometry at the IAC, Spain

Hector Socas-Navarro
04 Jan 2016

The Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC, Tenerife, Spain) invites applications for two postdoctoral positions on solar magnetic field diagnostics within the framework of project “Solar Magnetometry in the Era of Large Solar Telescopes”, led by Drs. Hector Socas-Navarro and Andres Asensio Ramos. One of the positions is shared with project “Manufacturing and integration of the QM, FM, and FS models of SO/PHI (Polarimetric and Helioseismic Imager for Solar Orbiter)”, led by Dr. Basilio Ruiz Cobo.

Qualification Requirements: To be eligible for admission, applicants must have obtained a Ph.D. degree in Astrophysics, Physics or Informatics/Programming prior to the application deadline (January 31, 2016).

Starting date and duration: The starting date can be any time after the end of the selection process, preferably within the first semester of 2016. Funds have been secured for a two-year appointment, but extension of the contract beyond December 31, 2017 requires the prior formal approval of the extension of the project beyond that date by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness. The appointing institution will be the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias.

Closing date for applications is January 31st, 2016.

For further specifications and requirements, salary scale and more information, including the online application submission form, please visit the following links:

Position 1: www.iac.es/info.php?op1=26&id=551&lang=en
Position 2: www.iac.es/info.php?op1=26&id=552&lang=en

Contact: For scientific enquires and informal discussion about these positions please contact Drs. H. Socas-Navarro or A. Asensio Ramos

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PhD Position in Solar Radiometry

Wolfgang Finsterle
05 Jan 2016

PMOD/WRC is curently seeking a candidate for a PhD project funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF). The project goals are to understand and correct the absorptivity changes of our solar radiometers in space and to develop a new absorptive black coating with ideal optical, thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties, as well as good applicability to radiometric sensors. Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) is an Essential Climate Variable (ECV). It is continuously monitored with dedicated solar radiometers from space. In order to detect and quanitify the secular changes in the TSI the highest level of accuracy and stability is required for these measurements. Over the past decade significant improvements have been made to the thermal and optical design of TSI radiometers, leaving sensor absorptance and degradation as the largest contribution to the measurement uncertainty.

PMOD/WRC is a world leading institute in the field of solar radiometry. We calibrate and operate radiometers on the ground and in space. We aim at flying an improved version of our DARA radiometer on the ESA PROBA-3 mission, wich is to be launched in 2018 or 19. The successful candiate will be closely involved with the development of the DARA radiometer for PROBA-3.

The successful applicant will work at PMOD/WRC in Davos Dorf, Switzerland. Regular visits to University of Zurich will be required. The position is open as of 1 November 2015. The project is currently funded for 3 years. Applicants who hold a master in physics or a related field are invited to send their resume to Dr. Wolfgang Finsterle ([email protected]).

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George Ellery Hale Post-Doctoral Researcher

Molly Hand
13 Jan 2016

ANNOUNCEMENT:  George Ellery Hale Postdoctoral Fellowship Position in Solar Physics at the University of Colorado Boulder

The University of Colorado Boulder is seeking applicants for the George Ellery Hale Postdoctoral Fellowship in Solar and Space Physics.  The University of Colorado and surrounding institutions provide a rich environment within which to conduct solar research, and this two-year research fellowship accompanies the relocation of the National Solar Observatory (NSO) headquarters to Boulder.

Of particular interest are postdoctoral candidates who are interested in theoretical and computational studies of dynamics within solar and stellar interiors, photospheres, and atmospheres (chromospheres and coronae).  Boulder is an internationally recognized center for studying convection, turbulence, radiative magnetohydrodynamics, and the dynamo amplification of magnetic fields in the Sun.  The successful candidate will have access to extensive computational resources and existing modern, highly parallel astrophysical fluid dynamics codes, and could be involved in the creation of next generation codes for studying solar fluid dynamics. Connections between such modeling activities efforts and the observational capabilities of NSO’s Daniel K Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly ATST) and/or Integrated Synoptic Program (NISP) will enhance an application, and the successful candidate is encouraged to forge those connections while in Boulder.

The successful candidate will also have the opportunity play a prominent role in the new George Ellery Hale collaborative graduate education program, which aims to offer solar physics course work and summer professional development to students enrolled in graduate programs at the University of Colorado, University of Hawaii, and the New Jersey Institute of Technology via telepresence technology.  The successful candidate will have the opportunity to work closely with the program to develop capability and facilitate learning in this distributed environment. Thus candidates with a strong interest and experience in teaching and learning methodologies, in addition to those more focused on solar physics research goals, are encouraged to apply.  For questions on this program, please contact Steve Cranmer ([email protected]).

Applicants should submit a curriculum vitae, a list of publications, a description of research and teaching interests, and the names and contact information for three references.  These materials should be submitted electronically to: cu.taleo.net/careersection/2/jobdetail.ftl?job=02874&lang=en&sns_id=mailto

For more information please contact Prof. Benjamin Brown, Search Committee Chair, [email protected].  Review of the applications will begin 1 February 2016 and continue until the position is filled.  The University of Colorado is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

The University of Colorado offers a full benefits package. Information on University benefits programs, including eligibility, is located at www.cu.edu/pbs/

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PROBA-3/ASPIICS Science Coordinator Position at the Royal Observatory of Belgium

David Berghmans
14 Jan 2016

We are looking for a Science Coordinator who will join the PI team of the ASPIICS coronagraph onboard the PROBA-3 mission that will be launched in 2019. The selected candidate will have a leading role concerning the tasks of the ASPIICS science team that currently include: definition of the coronagraph characteristics in collaboration with the hardware team, instrument and data calibration, design of science operations, and preparation of the development of the software infrastructure of the PROBA‑3 Science Operations Center. The successful candidate will personally pursue, as well as coordinate, solar physics research in preparation of the scientific exploitation of the ASPIICS data, and publish results in refereed journals.

PROBA (PRoject for On-Board Autonomy) is an ESA program of small technology demonstration satellites. PROBA-3, to be launched in 2019, is a mission dedicated to the in-flight demonstration of precise formation flying techniques and technologies. The PROBA-3 mission will place two spacecraft in a highly elliptical orbit around the Earth. The two spacecraft will fly in a precise formation, producing a very long baseline coronagraph called ASPIICS (Association of Spacecraft for Polarimetric and Imaging Investigation of the Corona of the Sun). One spacecraft will carry the optical telescope, and the second spacecraft will carry the external occulter of the coronagraph. The inter-satellite distance of around 150 m will allow observing the corona close to the solar limb with very low straylight.

The Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB, see www.observatory.be/) is a Belgian federal institute in the green outskirts of Brussels (Uccle). The PROBA-3 team at ROB is embedded in the “Solar Physics and Space Weather” Operational Directorate (SIDC, sidc.be), which is an international group of scientists and engineers. English is the baseline language spoken in the office, official ROB communication is available in French & Dutch. New employees at ROB are offered a 1-year contract, which, after mutual satisfaction, can be extended by 1 year and eventually by a contract of undetermined duration. The present position is at the SW3 salary scale (‘prime work leader’). Social security, pension scheme and working conditions are according to Belgian civil servant regulations.  These includes a flexible system of working hours and teleworking.

The ideal candidate for this position will combine a maximum of the following characteristics:
– PhD in solar physics
– extensive publications record in the field of coronal physics
– insight in the functioning of solar coronagraphs and coronagraph data,
– proven experience with ESA projects and mission proposals
– demonstrated ability to lead a team of scientists
– understanding of operational aspects of space weather
– fluent communication in written and spoken English and in at least one of the Belgian national languages (French/Dutch)

To apply, please send your CV, list of publications, and a motivation letter together with e-mail addresses of two persons who can provide a recommendation as soon as possible to the Director General of the Royal Observatory, Dr. Ronald Van der Linden (ronald dot vanderlinden at oma dot be). Questions and requests for more information should be sent to Dr. David Berghmans (david dot berghmans at sidc dot be), Head of SIDC.

The position is available immediately. Review of the applications will begin on 15 February 2016 and continue until the position is filled. More information will become available on sidc.be/jobs

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PROBA-3/ASPIICS Post-doctoral Position at the Royal Observatory of Belgium

Andrei Zhukov
14 Jan 2016

We are looking for a post-doctoral research assistant who will join the PI team of the ASPIICS coronagraph onboard the PROBA-3 mission that will be launched in 2019. The selected candidate will participate in fulfilling the tasks of the ASPIICS science team that currently include: definition of the coronagraph characteristics in collaboration with the hardware team, instrument and data calibration, design of science operations, and preparation of the development of the software infrastructure of the PROBA‑3 Science Operations Center. The successful candidate will also pursue solar physics research in preparation of the scientific exploitation of the ASPIICS data, and publish results in refereed journals.

PROBA (PRoject for On-Board Autonomy) is an ESA program of small technology demonstration satellites. PROBA-3, to be launched in 2019, is a mission dedicated to the in-flight demonstration of precise formation flying techniques and technologies. The PROBA-3 mission will place two spacecraft in a highly elliptical orbit around the Earth. The two spacecraft will fly in a precise formation, producing a very long baseline coronagraph called ASPIICS (Association of Spacecraft for Polarimetric and Imaging Investigation of the Corona of the Sun). One spacecraft will carry the optical telescope, and the second spacecraft will carry the external occulter of the coronagraph. The inter-satellite distance of around 150 m will allow observing the corona close to the solar limb with very low straylight.

The Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB, see www.observatory.be/) is a Belgian federal institute in the green outskirts of Brussels (Uccle). The PROBA-3 team at ROB is embedded in the “Solar Physics and Space Weather” Operational Directorate (sidc.be), which is an international group of scientists and engineers. English is the baseline language spoken in the office, official ROB communication is available in French and Dutch. New employees at ROB are offered a 1-year contract, which, after mutual satisfaction, can be extended by 1 year and eventually by a contract of undetermined duration. The present position will be at the SW1 (Assistant) or SW2 (Work Leader) salary scale depending on qualifications. Social security, pension scheme and working conditions are according to Belgian civil servant regulations. These include a flexible system of working hours and teleworking.

The ideal candidate for this position will combine a maximum of the following characteristics:
– PhD in solar physics or in a related field of physics or astrophysics,
– experience with observational and/or theoretical solar physics,
– programming skills, in particular in IDL (Interactive Data Language) and/or Python,
– experience with solar coronagraphs and coronagraph data,
– fluent communication in written and spoken English.

To apply, please send your CV, list of publications, and a motivation letter together with e-mail addresses of two persons who can provide a recommendation as soon as possible to the Principal Investigator of PROBA-3/ASPIICS, Dr. Andrei Zhukov (Andrei dot Zhukov at sidc dot be). Questions and requests for more information should be sent to the same e-mail address.

The position is available immediately. Review of the applications will begin on 15 February 2016 and continue until the position is filled.

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Postdoctoral Researcher in Solar Physics

Paola Testa
14 Jan 2016

Postdoctoral Researcher in Solar Physics
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
Closing Date = 31 January 2016

Applications are invited for a postdoctoral research position in the area of Solar Physics. The successful candidate will conduct research relevant to coronal heating, by using imaging and spectral data of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in conjunction with Hinode and SDO data. The postdoctoral researcher will work primarily with Dr Paola Testa (at Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, in Palo Alto, CA), but is also expected to spend part of the time at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (in Cambridge, MA) primarily working with Dr Kathy Reeves. The postdoctoral researcher will also have the opportunity to be involved in planning of IRIS science operations.

The candidate should have a good knowledge of solar physics and experience in the data analysis of solar observations, and preferably of EUV/UV spectral data. Applicants should have a PhD (or expect to complete a PhD soon) in solar physics, plasma physics, or a closely related field.

The position is for a 2 year period.  The postdoctoral researcher will be employed by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory; benefits include medical, dental, vision.

Closing date for applications is 31 January 2016. Submit CV, a 1-2 page research statement and 2 references to: 
Dr. Paola Testa

For an informal discussion about the post, please contact Dr Paola Testa (phone +1-650-424-2023)

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Meeting Announcements

AOGS 2016: Session ST19: Radio Heliophysics and Space Weather

Mario Bisi04 Jan 2016

Dear Colleagues.

We would like to invite you to submit a contributed abstract for our exciting upcoming AOGS 2016 session in Beijing, China, 31 July 2016 to 05 August 2016 – ST19: “Radio Heliophysics and Space Weather”.

The full session description is given below and the Conference WebPages can be found here: www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2016/

The full abstract-submission details are given here: www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2016/public.asp?page=abstract.htm; but please note that the AOGS Conference Fee only covers two abstracts – any more would require additional fees.  The abstract-submission deadline is 19 February 2016.

Please submit early so as not to have any last-minute submission problems…

Apologies if you receive multiple instances of this advertisement.

Many thanks and best wishes,

Mario M. Bisi (STFC RAL Space) – AOGS ST-H Secretary, and
T. Oyuki Chang M. (UNAM Morelia);
Convenors for ST19.

ST19: “Radio Heliophysics and Space Weather”

Various industries and aspects of human society have become highly reliant on modern technologies and regular, uninterrupted energy supplies, many of which are at risk from extreme space weather.  Such industries and our technologies can also be impacted to a lesser degree by the ‘everyday’ space weather that often occurs at the Earth during moderate-to-intense geomagnetic storms.  Such industries include the power grids, airlines, telecommunications, GNSS, etc…

Radio heliophysics in all aspects of space weather is being enhanced in no small part by the use of new-generation radio-telescope arrays such as the Long-Wavelength Array (LWA) in the USA, the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) in western Australia, and the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) in northern and western Europe.  In addition, various new techniques and model developments are, and have, enabled the use of radio systems to greater effect for space-weather purposes.  For example: solar radio bursts can now be studied in far-greater detail; interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations (via tomographic reconstructions) are being used to drive 3-D MHD models; tests of heliospheric Faraday rotation are being undertaken in the hope of being able to measure and predict Bz through the inner heliosphere; and new methods and advances are being made in ionospheric riometry and scintillation studies such as being able to obtain estimates of the height of the scattering screen in the ionosphere.

This session solicits contributions based around the ongoing development of space-weather forecasting services using radio techniques, new scientific methodologies that could be employed for space-weather purposes, novel results which could not be obtained before the advent of such radio systems, and plans for new observations (such as on the Square Kilometre Array – SKA) and new designs or concepts for future radio instruments.

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AOGS 2016: Session ST20: Sun and Heliosphere General Session Including Solar Diagnostic Techniques and Variabilty, and Helioseismology

Mario Bisi
04 Jan 2016

Dear Colleagues.

We would like to invite you to submit a contributed abstract for our exciting upcoming AOGS 2016 session in Beijing, China, 31 July 2016 to 05 August 2016 – ST20: “Sun and Heliosphere General Session Including Solar Diagnostic Techniques and Variabilty, and Helioseismology”.

The full session description is given below and the Conference WebPages can be found here: www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2016/

The full abstract-submission details are given here: www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2016/public.asp?page=abstract.htm; but please note that the AOGS Conference Fee only covers two abstracts – any more would require additional fees.  The abstract-submission deadline is 19 February 2016.

Please submit early so as not to have any last-minute submission problems…

Apologies if you receive multiple instances of this advertisement.

Many thanks and best wishes,

Mario M. Bisi (STFC RAL Space) – AOGS ST-H Secretary, and
Alessandra Giunta (STFC RAL Space);
Convenors for ST20.

ST20: “Sun and Heliosphere General Session Including Solar Diagnostic Techniques and Variabilty, and Helioseismology”

This is the general session of talks within the ST Section covering topics on the Sun and/or Heliosphere that are not suited to any of the other sessions available.  In addition, talks based on or around solar diagnostic techniques, the related atomic physics and spectroscopy, space climate, solar variability, or Helioseismology are also welcomed into this session including abstracts related to all aspects of solar irradiance as well as studies on climate change (local and/or global) that can be attributed to, at least in part, solar variability.  The Sun varies in brightness over differing time scales.  There is evidence that some climate change on Earth can be attributed to solar variability.  Variations in solar radiation output beyond that of the solar cycle are typically not well known.

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AOGS 2016: Session ST26: Call for Abstracts to the Session Multiwavelength and In-situ Observations of CME and Flare Evolution and Dynamics

Juan Carlos Martinez Oliveros
08 Jan 2016

Dear All,

We invite contributions to the session (ID#: ST26) “Multiwavelength and In-situ Observations of CME and Flare Evolution and Dynamics” at the AOGS meeting in Beijing from July 31 to August 5, 2016.  Details on the session follow.

We would like to remind you that the abstract submission deadline is 19 February 2016.

Abstracts can be submitted using the following link: www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2016/public.asp?page=abstract.htm

Best regards,

Juan Carlos Martinez Oliveros
Ying Liu
Hazel Bain
David Sundkvist

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Session Title:
Multiwavelength and In-situ Observations Of CME and Flare Evolution and Dynamics

Session Description:
Flares and CMEs are two spectacular manifestations of the explosive release of magnetic energy in the solar atmosphere. The released magnetic energy is transformed into kinetic and thermal energy and radiations. The focus of this session is to discuss how multi-wavelength observations and in situ measurements from current (IRIS, SDO, RHESSI, Hinode, NoRH, NRH, OVSA, STEREO, Wind, ACE) and future (Solar Orbiter, Solar Probe Plus) instruments and theoretical modeling can help our understanding of the mechanics, dynamics and evolution of these phenomena in the corona and interplanetary space.

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AOGS 2016: Session ST27: New Insights into the Physics of White-light Flares

Juan Carlos Martinez Oliveros
04 Jan 2016

Dear All,

We invite contributions to the session (ID#: ST27) “New Insights Into The Physics Of White-light Flares” at the AOGS meeting in Beijing, 31 Jul to 5 Aug, 2016.  Details on the session follow.

We would like to remind you that the abstract submission deadline is 19 February 2016.

Abstracts can be submitted using the following link: www.asiaoceania.org/aogs2016/public.asp?page=abstract.htm

Best regards,

Juan Carlos Martinez Oliveros
Hugh S Hudson
Lucia Kleint
Mingde Ding

——————————————————————
Session Title:
New Insights Into The Physics Of White-light Flares

Session Description:
The white-light continuum of a solar flare was the first manifestation of a flare ever detected, and this continuum emission contains a large fraction of the total luminous energy of a flare. Thus its identification has always posed an important problem for solar and stellar physics. A zoo of phenomena accompanies these events and their analysis can provide a wealth of information about the solar atmosphere. The focus of the discussion is the manifestation in the visible continuum of flares, from the corona to the solar interior and how multi wavelength observations (RHESSI, IRIS, SDO, Hinode, infrared, NoRH, OVSA) can help our understanding of the mechanics of momentum and energy transfer in the solar atmosphere.

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COSPAR 2016: Session D-2.2: Solar and Heliospheric Science with Future Space Missions

Bemporad Alessandro
07 Jan 2016

We invite abstract submissions for session D-2.2 titled “Solar and Heliospheric Science with Future Space Missions” at the upcoming COSPAR meeting (July 30-August 7, 2016) in Istanbul, Turkey. Abstract deadline is 12 February 2016 (www.cospar-assembly.org/).

Session description:

The next few years will see the launch of the ESA/NASA Solar Orbiter and the NASA Solar Probe Plus space missions, together with many other missions like Interhelioprobe (Roscosmos), Aditya (ISRO), SPORT (CNSA), Solar-C (JAXA), and others. The unique suite of remote sensing and in situ instruments that will be launched over the next few years will enable break-throughs in our understanding of solar dynamo and helioseismology, coronal heating, solar wind acceleration, and the mechanisms behind transient events such as coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles. These will be achieved also thanks to completely new views of the Sun that will be offered by some of these spacecraft (e.g. out-of-ecliptic orbit, close encounter, quadrature alignments, Parker-spiral alignments, etc…). This session seeks to explore the status of key solar and heliospheric science goals that may be addressed within the framework of this new complement of missions.  We invite contribution detailing past, present or future observations and strategies, data analysis results and techniques, existing or required theoretical and modelling developments, operational planning for joint instrument and/or mission observations that will be required to underpin scientific progress in this new era in solar and heliospheric exploration.

Event organizers: Alessandro Bemporad, INAF – Turin Astrophysical Observatory, Italy ([email protected]),
Christopher J. Owen – University College London, Mullard Space Science Laboratory, United Kingdom ([email protected])

Scientific Organizing Committee:
Dipankar Banerjee (Indian Institute of Astrophysics, India)
Louise Harra (Mullard Space Science Laboratory, UK)
Justin Kasper (University of Michigan, USA)
Sergei Kuzin (PN Lebedev Physical Institute, Russia)
Ying Liu (National Space Science Center, China)
Jean-Claude Vial (Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, France)
Tetsuya Watanabe (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan)

Confirmed Solicited Speakers:
Sarah Gibson (HAO, USA)
Viggo Hansteen (Univ. of Oslo, Norway)
Ryoko Ishikawa (NAO, Japan)
Vladimir Kuznetsov (IZMIRAN, Russia)
Christian Moestl (Univ. of Graz, Austria)
Toshifumi Shimizu (JAXA, Japan)
Durgesh Tripathi (IUCAA, India)
Bojan Vrsnak (Univ. of Zagreb, Croatia)
Ming Xiong (NSSC, China)
Andrei Zhukov (ROB, Belgium)
Yannis Zouganelis (ESA/ESAC)

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COSPAR 2016: Session D-2.3: Call for Abstracts: Observations and Modeling of Accelerated Particles at the Sun and in the Inner Heliosphere

Bob Wimmer
04 Jan 2016

We would like to draw your attention to COSPAR session D-2.3 “Coordinated Observations and Modeling of Accelerated Particles at the Sun and in the Inner Heliosphere” and invite you to submit an abstract to this session.

This session will be devoted to the energetic particles at the Sun and in the Heliosphere. It will deal both with observations and modeling and is aimed at describing the general knowledge on this topic based on the recent observations from the numerous instruments on the different heliospheric missions. The session will discuss both escaping particles and particles interacting at the Sun (diagnosed from X-ray, gamma-ray and radio observations), the relative role of flares and CMEs in the acceleration process, the propagation of particles in the interplanetary medium…

COSPAR will take place from July 30-August 7, 2016, in Istanbul, Turkey. The meeting web page is www.cospar-assembly.org/

Abstract submission deadline is February 12, 2016. Note that you can submit multiple abstracts to this meeting.

Yours,

Bob Wimmer (MSO)
Nicole Vilmer (DO)

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COSPAR 2016: Session PSW-5: Understanding Space Weather to Shield Society: A Global Roadmap for 2015 – 2025 Commissioned by COSPAR and ILWS

Karel Schrijver
07 Jan 2016

We invite submissions to session PSW.5 at the 2016 COSPAR Assembly in Istanbul, Turkey, 30 July – 7 August.

Several key physical processes in the chain of Sun-Earth connections remain insufficiently understood for accurate and timely space weather forecasting. A recently completed roadmap identified these processes (Advances in Space Research, 2015: DOI: 10.1016/j.asr.2015.03.023 ), prioritized steps to be taken and outline concepts for future modeling capabilities and deployment of new instrumentation.

The organizers of this session seek perspectives from the scientific and operational communities, as well as of impacted societal sectors, on the roadmap’s recommendations. We invite contributions on future activities in support of the primary goal of the roadmap: to deepen our scientific understanding of the local cosmos and thereby enable improvements to current information provision to space weather service users.

Submission deadline: 12 February 2016. A complete description of the event referred to above and abstract submission instructions are available on the Assembly web page at: www.cospar-assembly.org

SOC: Karel Schrijver (Main Scientific Organizer), Kirsti Kauristie (Deputy Scientific Organizer), Anna Belahaki, Tom Berger, Nat Gopalswamy, and Jussi Luntama.

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IRIS-6: “The Chromosphere”, Registration for the Workshop opens January 15, 2016

Jorrit Leenaarts
13 Jan 2016

The aim of the workshop is to bring together researchers interested in the physics of the solar chromosphere and its connections to the photosphere and corona from both an observational (whether with IRIS or with other observatories) and a theoretical point of view.

Date and location: June 20 to June 23, 2016, Stockholm, Sweden

Registration and abstract submission starts on Jan 15, 2016 at www.isf.astro.su.se/iris-6/

Important dates:
16 January: Registration opens.
15 March: Last day for abstract submission and application for travel support
15 May: Last day for registrations.
20 May: Final day for reservations/cancellations of block-booked hotel rooms.

Invited speakers:
Patrick Antolin, Mats Carlsson, Manolo Collados, Jaime de la Cruz Rodríguez, Ryoko Ishikawa, Lucia Kleint, David Orozco Suárez, Hardi Peter, Bart de Pontieu, Tom Schad, Göran Scharmer, Gary Verth, Alfred de Wijn

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SDO/HMI Data Calibration Splinter Session at SPD Meeting in Boulder, Colorado

Alexei Pevtsov
14 Jan 2016

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to initiate a community discussion of issues related to calibration of data from the Heliospheric and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Currently, HMI is the prime instrument that provides full-disk vector and line-of-sight magnetograms and Doppler maps for scientific research and space weather forecasting. The HMI team strives to provide the best calibrated data to the international community; however, several issues still require better understanding and development of mitigation approaches. As a next step, we encourage interested scientists working with HMI data to consider submission of poster presentations on HMI calibration to the 2016 SPD meeting in Boulder, Colorado.  We also plan to have a splinter session at the SPD meeting to promote discussion of issues related to HMI calibration. Information about the instrument and calibration can be found at jsoc.stanford.edu/jsocwiki/HMICalibrationInfo

Todd Hoeksema and Alexei Pevtsov

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EWASS 2016: Special Session SS2: Solar-Terrestrial Coupling and Space Weather: State-of-the-Art and Future Prospects

Spiros Patsourakos
14 Jan 2016

EWASS 2016: Special Session SS2: Solar-Terrestrial Coupling and Space Weather: State-of-the-Art and Future Prospects

This is the first announcement of special session SS2 during the upcoming European Week of Astronomy and Space Science (EWASS) meeting, that will take place during 4 – 8 July 2016 in Athens, Greece.

Our special session will combine observations, data analysis, theory and numerical simulations, to address the following outstanding questions:
(1) How does the coupling between solar magnetic fields and plasma flows power solar eruptions? (Emergence and evolution of solar magnetic fields, triggering and evolution of solar eruptions, corona and solar wind formation).
(2) How does the solar wind interact with the ejecta and how do the terrestrial and planetary magnetospheres react to the severely perturbed solar wind? (propagation of CMEs and Solar Energetic Particles in turbulent solar wind plasmas, development of geospace magnetic storms, acceleration of electrons to relativistic energies in the Van Allen radiation belts)
(3) Multi-scale observations of the Magnetosphere–Ionosphere–Thermosphere System (new results from the RBSP and MMS missions).

We solicit both oral and poster contributions. Abstract submission deadline is 15 March 2016. More info about the special session and the meeting may be found in eas.unige.ch/EWASS2016/ and eas.unige.ch/EWASS2016/session.jsp?id=SS2 respectively.

The special session’s organizers:
V. Archontis,
I.A. Daglis,
S. Patsourakos,
A. Vourlidas

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IAGA-IV Symposium “Influence of Short and Long Term Solar Variability on Climate”

Luc Damé
14 Jan 2016

***************  Second Announcement   ***************

Dear Colleagues and Friends!

We have the great pleasure to invite you to submit abstracts before February 1st to the IAGA-IV Symposium “Influence of short and long term solar variability on climate”, 20 – 24 March, 2016, in the Golden 5* Emerald Resort at Hurghada, Egypt Red Sea.

IAGA-IV Symposium includes sessions on:
– Solar and Space missions for Space Weather and solar variability observations
– Solar activity effects on climate at different wavelengths
– Solar variability influence on the lower, middle and upper atmosphere
– Modeling of solar activity influence on climate, and suggested mechanisms
– Modeling and predicting large flares, CMEs and extreme events
– Solar energetic particles role on the Earth atmosphere and climate.

Important deadlines:
01 Feb 2016   Symposium abstract submission
15 Feb 2016   Notification to authors
01 Mar 2016   Early Bird Registration

For more information, see the symposium website iaga.cu.edu.eg

For questions, contact: Ahmed Hady

Welcome to IAGA-IV Symposium in Hurghada!

Sincerely Yours,

Ahmed Hady (SOC & LOC chair) and Luc Damé (SOC vice-chair)

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Editor’s Note

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Aimee Norton
01 May 2015

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